Beach House Clifton

This 1970’s timber-frame bungalow, distinguished from its neighbours by its virtually flat roof, was remodelled exactly 40 years after it was first built, to suit the family’s contemporary lifestyle.

The strict regulatory requirements of this special conservation area, coupled with the budget, obliged us to be inventive and resourceful with the design.

Retaining the original post and beam structure allowed the interior to be scooped out to create an entirely new experience of living in the house, connecting the interior and exterior spaces in a more meaningful and direct way.

‘The house is essentially a study in timber; some old, sanded down to raw, combined with new timber such as Japanese cedar, redwood, teak, and ash, all living harmoniously together like trees in a forest’

The large open plan kitchen, dining and living room on the upper level, with generous sliding doors open onto a wrap around timber deck, anchoring the house to its beach-front location and providing a dramatic outlook over the ocean.

Steel framed factory-style windows, salvaged from an industrial building, connect this beach house to the land, by opening up a view onto the steep slope behind the house, and the herb and vegetable garden tucked into the free spaces between the granite boulders.

On the lower level, the generous family room can be divided into a separate guest suite when required, by means of barn-style sliding timber doors, which slide away when not in use.

The house makes use of all available spaces and opportunities offered by the site, such as the home study tucked into the circulation space adjoining the kitchen, and the outdoor shower which has a large granite bolder as its backdrop.

Much of the timber and fittings salvaged from the original house are repurposed in the new design, such as the porthole window, which now offers a view from the home study through the house to the ocean, and the original exterior mahogany cladding, now sanded down to its raw state and used for interior cladding.

Old teak electrical distribution board boxes now form a complete wall of double sided storage cabinets between the scullery and dining room, allowing crockery and glasses to be stored and reached from either side when needed.

Kitchen cabinets from the original house have been reconfigured into a galley style kitchen, and timber post boxes salvaged from an old building, now form a library wall, housing recipe and gardening books.

The house is essentially a study in timber; some old, sanded down to raw, combined with new timber such as Japanese cedar, redwood, teak, and ash, all living harmoniously together like trees in a forest.

 

 

 

 

Beach House Clifton

This 1970’s timber-frame bungalow, distinguished from its neighbours by its virtually flat roof, was remodelled exactly 40 years after it was first built, to suit the family’s contemporary lifestyle.

The strict regulatory requirements of this special conservation area, coupled with the budget, obliged us to be inventive and resourceful with the design.

Retaining the original post and beam structure allowed the interior to be scooped out to create an entirely new experience of living in the house, connecting the interior and exterior spaces in a more meaningful and direct way.

‘The house is essentially a study in timber; some old, sanded down to raw, combined with new timber such as Japanese cedar, redwood, teak, and ash, all living harmoniously together like trees in a forest’

The large open plan kitchen, dining and living room on the upper level, with generous sliding doors open onto a wrap around timber deck, anchoring the house to its beach-front location and providing a dramatic outlook over the ocean.

Steel framed factory-style windows, salvaged from an industrial building, connect this beach house to the land, by opening up a view onto the steep slope behind the house, and the herb and vegetable garden tucked into the free spaces between the granite boulders.

On the lower level, the generous family room can be divided into a separate guest suite when required, by means of barn-style sliding timber doors, which slide away when not in use.

The house makes use of all available spaces and opportunities offered by the site, such as the home study tucked into the circulation space adjoining the kitchen, and the outdoor shower which has a large granite bolder as its backdrop.

Much of the timber and fittings salvaged from the original house are repurposed in the new design, such as the porthole window, which now offers a view from the home study through the house to the ocean, and the original exterior mahogany cladding, now sanded down to its raw state and used for interior cladding.

Old teak electrical distribution board boxes now form a complete wall of double sided storage cabinets between the scullery and dining room, allowing crockery and glasses to be stored and reached from either side when needed.

Kitchen cabinets from the original house have been reconfigured into a galley style kitchen, and timber post boxes salvaged from an old building, now form a library wall, housing recipe and gardening books.

The house is essentially a study in timber; some old, sanded down to raw, combined with new timber such as Japanese cedar, redwood, teak, and ash, all living harmoniously together like trees in a forest.